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Archive for July, 2016

McCleary Resources

Children standing in front of a chalkboard - League of Education VotersIn McCleary v. State of Washington, the Washington Supreme Court ruled that because the state government is not providing sufficient education funding, it is violating the state’s constitution. Further, the Court found that inadequate funding from the state is leading to inequalities and disparities between wealthy and poor school districts, because some districts are only able to raise a fraction of the money through local levies as other districts, despite having a higher local levy tax rate.

The Court has ordered the state to address this issue by increasing education funding and reducing reliance on local levies to pay for teacher salaries and other basic education essentials. Estimates say that complying with the Court’s decision will require the state to spend an additional 1.5 – 2 billion dollars more per year on public education.

2017 Legislative Scorecard

Resources that will help clarify the debate over education funding:

What You Need to Know about the 2017 McCleary School Funding Agreement (blog)

What You Need to Know about the 2017 McCleary School Funding Agreement (webinar)

McCleary Explained

Glossary of Key Education Terms

Definition of Basic Education

See how much Washington state spends per student in your district

Side-by-Side of Education Funding Proposals

Local Levy FAQ

LEV’s Perspective on the Latest Supreme Court McCleary Response

Our view on McCleary opportunities:

Rethinking Our Education System

Teachers: The Most Important Part of Our Education System

Every Student Needs an Effective Teacher

Great Teachers Need Great Preparation

Student Supports, an Integral Component of Basic Education

 

Presentations on education funding by the LEV Policy Team:

TVW: League of Education Voters McCleary Presentation (November 18, 2016)

  1. I Can See McClear-ly Now: A look at the education funding debate in Washington, gives you an in-depth look at how we got where we are today.
  2. We Can Work it Out: A long and winding road to funding basic education, covers whether our current education funding structure is fair and whether the system benefits all kids.

 

Other resources:

LEVinar on The McCleary Task Force: What to Expect Archived Recording | Presentation Slides

McCleary Education Funding Task Force Duties and Responsibilities

Senate Bill 6195, which created the Education Funding Task Force

Our view on NPR Education’s School Money series: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

A summary of our November 2016 field trip to California, Education Funding Takeaways from California

Posted in: Funding

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What Is Basic Education?

Classroom Students

By the LEV Policy Team

In Washington state, it is the state’s “paramount duty” to fund a program of basic education for all students. It is the Legislature’s responsibility to define that program of basic education. The Legislature has established goals for the education system, as well as a program intended to achieve those goals. The program of basic education can be changed and added to. It may only be reduced for educational reasons, not financial reasons. The instructional program of basic education is provided through the K-12 system, as well as in juvenile detention facilities, residential facilities, and adult correctional facilities (RCW 28A.150.200).

The Goals of Basic Education (RCW 28A.150.210)

  1. Read with comprehension, write effectively, and communicate successfully in a variety of ways and settings and with a variety of audiences;
  2. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history, including different cultures and participation in representative government; geography; arts; and health and fitness;
  3. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate technology literacy and fluency as well as different experiences and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and
  4. Understand the importance of work and finance and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.

The Program of Basic Education (RCW 28A.150.220)

The program of basic education is the legislatively defined basic education that the state must fully fund. Districts must use state funding to provide all of the following components to students.

Time:

•   1,000 hours of instruction for full-day Kindergarten (being phased in)

•   1,000 hours of instruction for grades 1-8 (districtwide average)*

•   1,080 hours of instruction for grades 9-12 (districtwide average)*

•   At least 180 school days

*Can be calculated as districtwide average of 1,027 hours grades 1-12

Academics:

•    Instruction in the Essential Academic Learning Requirements (adopted by Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction)

o The Arts

o English Language Arts (Common Core)

o English Language Proficiency

o Early Learning

o Math (Common Core)

o Science

o Social Studies

o Educational Technology

o Health and Physical Education

o Integrated Environment and Sustainability

o World Languages

•    The opportunity to complete 24 credits for a high school diploma

Supports:

•   Learning Assistance Program—supplemental instruction for “underachieving” students

•   Transitional Bilingual Instructional Program—supplemental instruction for English Language Learners

•   Special Education—appropriate education and supports for students with disabilities

•   Highly Capable Program—programs for highly capable students

•   Transportation (RCW 28A.150.200)

Components provided in the prototypical school funding formula (RCW 28A.150.260), such as Materials, Supplies, and Operating Costs (MSOC) or specific staffing ratio­­s do not constitute the program of basic education. They represent the Legislature’s assumptions of what resources are required to provide the program of basic education, but districts may choose to deliver the program in a different way.

Basic Education Compliance

Each district must certify to the State Board of Education that it is providing students with the minimum requirements of the basic education act. Districts must report that they provide:

  • K-12 students with 180 days of instruction
  • Kindergarten students with either 450 or 1,000 instructional hours, depending on full-day Kindergarten phase-in
  • Grades 1-8 students with a districtwide average of 1,000 instructional hours and grades 9-12 students with a districtwide average of 1,080 instructional hours, OR a districtwide average of 1,027 hours across grades 1-12
  • The opportunity to complete a 24-credit high school diploma

Instructional Hours: the definition of instructional hour is time in the school day from the beginning of the first period class to the end of the last period class, except for time spent on meals. Passing time and recess are counted as instructional time.

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Education Advocate July 2016

ED Advocate, League of Education Voters Newsletter, July 2016

Greetings

Chris Korsmo
Chris Korsmo, CEO

Summer is in full swing and hopefully you’re able to enjoy the Great Northwest and beyond with your family.  Here in LEV land, we’re gearing up for the upcoming legislative session and thought you might like a glossary of key education terms, which you can read here.

Looking ahead, we are hosting free Lunchtime LEVinars on the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) July 19 and 21, featuring longtime Tukwila School Board Member and education guru Mary Fertakis. Join us to learn more about what this important federal law means for our kids.

One of the most important elections this year is for the next Superintendent of Public Instruction.  LEV is involved in two candidate forums – Seattle July 19 and Pasco July 25.  Take advantage of a great opportunity to meet and ask questions of the people who want to run Washington’s schools.

I am pleased to announce the release of our 2015 annual report, Finding a Way Forward. 2015 was a successful year as we worked to improve public education throughout Washington state, and we couldn’t have done it without your support. 

Finally, I would like to extend a big thank-you to all of our second quarter donors. You make our work possible. 

Thanks for all you do for kids.

Chris Korsmo signature

 

 

Chris Korsmo

Finding a Way Forward

2015 Annual Report: Finding a Way ForwardAt the League of Education Voters, we believe a student’s education should be a continuum with seamless transitions. 2015 was a successful year as we worked to improve public education throughout Washington state. We are pleased to release our 2015 annual report, Finding a way forward, and we invite you to read highlights from the past year. Read more

Free Lunchtime LEVinars July 19 and 21

ESSA LEVinars July 19 and 21

The new Every Student Succeeds Act, which takes full effect in the 2017-18 school year, rolls back much of the federal government’s big footprint in education policy, on everything from testing and teacher quality to low-performing schools. And it gives new leeway to states in calling the shots. That’s a big change from the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), which ESSA replaced and updated.

In this two-part LEVinar series, Tukwila School Board Member (and LEV June Activist of the Month) Mary Fertakis will answer your questions on how ESSA will affect education in Washington state and what it could do for civil rights and equity. Moderated by our State Field Director, Kelly Munn. Register here

OSPI Candidate Forums July 19 and 25

OSPI Candidate ForumsCandidates who want to lead Washington’s school system as its next superintendent will speak at forums around the state. LEV is co-sponsoring a candidate forum in Seattle at 5:15pm Tuesday, July 19 and we’re hosting a candidate forum in Pasco at 6:00pm Monday, July 25. Learn more

Celebrating our donors

Thank you!Donations are made to the League of Education Voters (LEV) and the LEV Foundation by individuals, groups, and businesses throughout the community. These generous donations from those who believe in high-quality public education allow us to ensure measurable progress toward LEV’s vision that every student in Washington state has access to an excellent public education that provides the opportunity for success.

We’d like to take a moment to celebrate our supporters who donated to LEV or the LEV Foundation between April 1 and June 30 of this year. Thank you!

Get Involved

COMING UP

July 19, 2016 | OSPI Candidate Forum, New Holly Gathering Hall, Seattle
July 25, 2016 | OSPI Candidate Forum, LEV Pasco Office, Pasco

LUNCHTIME LEVINARS

July 19 and 21, 2016 | Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA): What You Need to Know, Online webinar


HELP SUPPORT THE LEAGUE OF EDUCATION VOTERS
| Donate online


League of Education Voters

League of Education Voters2734 Westlake Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109
206.728.6448
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