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July Education Advocate, the LEV Monthly E-news

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Greetings

Chris Korsmo

Chris Korsmo

Now that the state budget negotiations have finally crossed the goal line, I am happy to report that our legislature has made a huge investment in K-12 education! Thanks to your advocacy and support, schools with historically underserved students will get much-needed additional help. Read more about the legislature’s solution to the Supreme Court’s McCleary decision in this blog by Daniel Zavala, LEV’s director of policy and government relations. Be a part of this landmark moment! Help ensure that the McCleary decision is implemented to benefit every Washington student by making your gift today.

Also, LEV interviewed Washington state Superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal about his long-term vision for K-12 education. And we’re hosting a free Lunchtime LEVinar July 20 on how adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and complex trauma impacts student learning.

Read below for more about our work.

Thanks for all you do for kids. We couldn’t do it without you.

Chris Korsmo

Chris Reykdal OSPIChris Reykdal discusses his six-year K-12 education plan

League of Education Voters Communications Director Arik Korman sat down with Superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal to discuss his six-year K-12 education plan, how the plan would prepare our kids for what comes after high school, and how we can help make it happen. Listen now

 

 


ACEs studentHow ACEs & Complex Trauma Impacts Student Learning

Childhood experiences, both positive and negative, have a tremendous impact on lifelong health and opportunity. Much of the foundational research in this area has been referred to as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). David Lewis, Program Manager of Behavioral Health Services at Seattle Public Schools, will describe how trauma impacts a student’s ability to be successful, and will share best assessment and teaching practices. Register now

 


WA Capitol Legislative BldgWhat You Need To Know About the McCleary School Funding Agreement

In what was quite literally years in the making, the Legislature has at long last presented and passed a K-12 funding solution. And, perhaps surprisingly in today’s political climate, it was passed with strong bipartisan support. Read more

 


summer learning slide Summer Learning Loss, and What You Can Do To Prevent It

School is out and the sun is shining! While summer is filled with lots of fun, time away from school can have a negative impact on students. Read now

 

 


Get Involved

Join us for a LEVinar: How ACEs and Complex Trauma Impact Learning | Register now

HELP SUPPORT THE LEAGUE OF EDUCATION VOTERS | Donate online

Posted in: LEV News, Uncategorized

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What You Need to Know about the McCleary School Funding Agreement

What You Need to Know about the McCleary School Funding Agreement

By Daniel Zavala, LEV Director of Policy and Government Relations

In what was quite literally years in the making, the Legislature has at long last presented and passed a K-12 funding solution. And, perhaps surprisingly in today’s political climate, it was passed with strong bipartisan support. Before I get into the details of the solution, let me spend some time talking about how we got to where we are… and it starts with a 2007 lawsuit called McCleary. The lawsuit was largely based on the inequities across districts resulting from disproportionate use and allocation of local levy money. Basically, the plaintiffs argued the state was not amply paying for basic education, something that is a paramount duty of the state. Fast forward to 2012… and the Washington Supreme Court agreed. Forward another few years, a couple of court orders, imposed sanctions on the legislature, and we arrive at the 2017 Legislative Session – the last regular session to address the court order to address the McCleary decision. What was left after the last 5 years was the need to continue progress on funding K-3 class size reduction and teacher compensation.

But most of us already know this saga and are frankly ready to hear the solution… or we are wondering what all the commotion around Olympia these days is about. Well, here are the high level details of the K-12 plan:

  • Overall some significant advances were made, but there’s still plenty of work to be done.
  • Regarding funding, the legislature made historic increased investments in education.
  • Although the legislature directed some additional funding to programs for historically underserved students, the needs and opportunity gaps are vast. There is some promise with the state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) receiving funds to identify key methods to do so using new data collection.
  • The prototypical funding formula (the state’s method of funding schools based on a school design to determine the number of teachers, principals, and other school staff that are needed to provide a basic education) will remain intact. Although a key source of inequity, the staff mix formula (paying districts based on the experience level of their teachers) was eliminated, some steps that might have modernized the funding formula to target funds and address the complex needs of some of the most at-risk student populations (such as special education students) were not adopted.
  • Auditing compliance and enforcement will be key to ensure we don’t get back to where we started – e.g. paying educators much more in property-rich districts. After all, policy is only as good as its implementation.
  • The agreement minimally addresses accountability, but there are other mechanisms under development to ensure our education system produces good results.

Want to know the deeper details of the plan? Take a look at our McCleary Agreement Overview and Analysis.

Okay, so if you are still with me, whether it is actually 5 years later or, after trying to digest all of that information it feels like 5 years, you likely have two questions remaining:

  1. Does this solution pass constitutional muster, i.e. will we have made the court happy?
  2. What does all this mean and what is next?

As to the first question, only the nine justices that sit in that high court can properly answer that question. However, in their order they noted that the K-12 funding had to be regular and dependable in addressing K-3 class size reduction and teacher compensation. There is strong evidence to suggest this plan does that.

As to the second question, that answer is far more complex and probably better suited over another LEVinar or post(s). But in short, it means that our state may be moving on to the next stage of education advocacy in this state — from Does this satisfy McCleary? to What do we need to do to address the growing gaps in our system between historically underserved students and their college-bound peers?

Posted in: Legislative session

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Summer Learning Loss, and What You Can Do To Prevent It

Summer Learning Loss, and What You Can Do To Prevent It

Summer learning loss, what is it?

School is out and the sun is shining! While summer is filled with lots of fun, time away from school can have a negative impact on students. Summer learning loss occurs when students don’t reinforce what they have learned throughout the school year, leading to a loss in knowledge and the need for teachers to spend the first weeks of school re-teaching skills that students learned the previous year. While there are many factors that come into play, some students lose over 2 months of math and reading knowledge during the summer. Fret not! Despite this, there are ways that parents can help keep their kids engaged in learning all summer long. Here is our guide to free (or nearly free) ideas and resources to help keep your little learners, elementary schoolers, and teenagers engaged in learning all summer long.

Our favorite ideas and resources to combat summer learning loss:

 

greatschools.org- Summer Learning Loss BlogGreatschools.org

Looking for pre-K resources for your little learner? Greatschools.org offers free printable worksheets for students in pre-K all the way to 5th grade. They also offer resources for students and families from the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. Visit this site for a wealth of resources, tests, worksheets and articles.

 

 

Khan Academy Homepage- Summer Learning Loss BlogKhan Academy

One of the hardest subjects to keep up with during the summer can be math. Reading a book can be a treat at bedtime, but keeping up with fractions can be a bit trickier. The Khan Academy is a stellar resource. Their wealth of subject matter ranges from the basics to calculus, with everything in between. They also have coding resources for your the programmer-to-be in your family, as well as a variety of science and engineering resources. Is your teen getting ready to take those college entrance exams? The Khan Academy also offers test prep resources. Oh, and not to mention you can brush up on your macroeconomics and AP US history as well. This overall STEAM knowledge base should not be overlooked.

Postcard- Summer Learning Loss BlogWrite a Postcard

Travelling making it hard to budget studying time for your kids? On your travels have your kids pick out postcards that they would like to send to their friends and family and have them write their own letters. This is a great way to combat summer learning loss by practicing grammar, spelling, and punctuation on the go. It’s also a fun surprise for the recipients. Bring your child into the process by having them pick out the postcards they would like to send, then they will feel more connected and personally invested in the writing process. It’s a win-win for you and them!

Children's Books- Summer Learning LossGrab a book

Just about any will do! Head over to your nearest library, or maybe there is a homemade ‘little library‘ sitting on a corner in your neighborhood. Reading is one of the main subjects that summer learning loss is affected by. There are many reading lists out there:

Try this reading list from the Seattle Public Library for ages 3-5.

Or try this summer reading list from the Spokane Public Library (there is even one for adults too!).

Is your teen college bound? Here are NPR’s summer reading list suggestions.

No Bake Peanut Butter Chocolate Bars- Summer Learning Loss BlogCook with your kids

Speaking of fractions, what better way to get some hands on learning than to cook a meal with the kids. Cooking combines math and chemistry to create something special, and getting the kids involved can be a fun learning opportunity. Cooking can also give kids knowledge about healthy nutrition, and reading a recipe can help them work on their reading comprehension skills. PBS Parents offers some tips for getting your kids to join you in the kitchen, as well as recipes that kids are sure to love. We recommend checking out these No Bake Chocolate Peanut Butter Squares. Yum!

While you’re at it, why don’t you see if it’s possible to cook a s’more without fire or electricity?

duolingo homepage - summer learning lossDuolingo

Parlez-vous Français? Need to brush up on your German verb conjugations? Summer learning loss can affect students trying to learn a language if they don’t receive consistent practice. Duolingo is a comprehensive, free resource to help your student stay sharp in a variety of languages. They offer lessons in over 20 different languages, including Irish, Norwegian, and Swahili just to name a few. They have iOS and Android apps, so your kids can practice on the go. For the teachers out there, they also have classroom resources too.

 

HTML CodingCode Academy

Is your student interested in learning how to build websites, web applications, or ready to dive into more complex topics like database management? Code Academy is a great resource to learn responsive web design, HTML and CSS, or even Ruby on Rails. This free resource can help keep your kids and teens engaged in coding all summer long. All languages take consistent practice, including coding languages, and resources like Code Academy or the aforementioned Khan Academy can help prevent summer learning loss for students studying coding and computer programming.

Now get out there and learn!

There are opportunities for educational moments every day, and the internet is full of ideas a resources to help you along the way. Get the whole family involved in these fun math activities, enjoy a free children’s ebook, or make your own postcards to send to love ones. Fostering a spirit of discovery in your child’s life will help them continue to learn, grow, and be better students. Summer learning loss be banished! If you have any other ideas, or if you try out any of our suggestions, please tell us about it in the comments below. Happy summer!

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Sources:

Schools, Achievement, and Inequality: A Seasonal Perspective

Posted in: Blog, STEM

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Korsmo’s Weekly Roundup: All Hail the State Budget

It’s here, it’s here, it’s finally here!

Chris Korsmo

Chris Korsmo

No, you fickle weather babies, it’s not summer. Which arrives Wednesday of next week and leaves about September 3. It’s not the Sunday Amazon Prime cat food delivery, either. And while it might feel like it to legislators, it’s not Christmas in (almost) July. The “it” in question is the state budget. After a full regular session, three special sessions, a gang of eight, a four-corner agreement and a partridge in a pear tree, we have a proposed budget. With little time to review and a government shut- down looming, legislators will take up the $47B + measure later today. Winner? Well, McCleary, it’s your birthday, get your dance on, it’s your birthday. If you’re not doing the cabbage patch or sprinkler by now, you’re not feeling the gravity of the moment. Yes, the devil’s in the details – and those are several hundred pages long – the legislature is proposing a historic increase in education funding and dedicated funds toward historically underserved student populations – including a new funding stream for high poverty schools that guarantees targeted resources for academically struggling students in those schools.

The historic increases in education funding couldn’t come a moment too soon. Washington isn’t doing so well by its kids – the new Annie E. Casey Kids Count report is out and Washington ranks 14th in overall child well-being. This is a report that could have been written by Justice Bobbi Bridge, who in a recent LEVinar warned that we can pay now or pay later. We’ve advocated for paying it forward, with resources going to kids based on need.

It’s a great day to stream TVW  – today’s budget negotiations are must-see TV.

In other news:

Well kids, it’s about that time. July is upon us and the garden beckons. Have a wonderful summer! And as always, thanks for all you’re doing on behalf of Washington’s students.

Chris

Posted in: Blog, Funding, Legislative session, Weekly Roundup

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June Education Advocate, the LEV Monthly E-news

 

ED Advocate, League of Education Voters Newsletter, June 2017

Greetings

Chris Korsmo

Chris Korsmo, CEO

As you may know, the Washington legislature is now in the endgame of budget negotiations, which includes finding a solution to funding schools across our state. If you want to see what lawmakers are considering to solve the Supreme Court’s McCleary decision, take a look at our education funding plan side-by-side. Be a part of this historic moment! Help ensure that the McCleary decision is implemented to benefit every Washington student by making your gift today.

Also, LEV interviewed Washington STEM CEO Caroline King on how STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) and career connected learning can be applied in the classroom. And we’re hosting a free Lunchtime LEVinar June 20 with former Supreme Court Justice Bobbe Bridge, Founder and CEO of the Center for Children & Youth Justice, on how the education and justice communities can work together to support youth in crisis.

Read below for more about our work.

Thanks for all you do for kids. We couldn’t do it without you.

Chris Korsmo signature

 

 

Chris Korsmo


Washington STEM CEO Caroline King

How would Washington STEM CEO Caroline King design an education system?

League of Education Voters Communications Director Arik Korman sat down with Washington STEM CEO Caroline King to discuss how STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) and Career Connected Learning can be applied in the classroom, and how she would design an education system from scratch. Listen now

 

 

 


Activating EducationLEVinar: Activating Education and Justice Communities to Support Youth in Crisis & Justice Communities to Support Youth in Crisis

When kids start to disconnect from school, it’s a critical warning sign. Chronic absences are all too frequently the start of a path that leads straight to involvement in the juvenile justice system. Thousands of kids each year begin a journey on this “school-to-prison pipeline,” and we miss out on generations of leaders, innovators, educators, and entrepreneurs. Register now

 

 

 


Activist of the Month: June

Activist of the Month: Miguel Lucatero

Miguel Lucatero is a licensed home child care provider since 2001 who is participating in the Early Achievers program. He is also the parent spokesperson for Padres de Familia Preocupados por la Educacion y el Exito de Sus Hijos (Parents of Families Concerned for the Education and Success of their Children). Read more

 

 

 


Education Funding Side-by-Side

Education Funding Side-by-Side

What are lawmakers considering to solve the McCleary education funding problem? Our in depth side-by-side document lays down the details. View it now

 

 

 

 


Get Involved

Many of you are watching closely and know that the legislature is now in its second special session. We would like to encourage lawmakers to collaborate in order to work out a solution that puts fair funding into K-12 public education.


The Campaign for Student Success believes our education system should:

  • Provide students the opportunity to earn credits for college while still in high school.
  • Ensure that dollars follow your student to the classroom – whether they’re spent for English language learners, advanced placement or special education – not on bureaucracy.
  • Help remove barriers in getting to school for kids who are in poverty, who are homeless, or who face other challenges that increase their risk of falling behind.
  • Prepare all kids to graduate from high school prepared for careers or college based on their interest and talent.

We need your help in the following two ways:

  • Make a visit to your legislator in your district.
  • Make phone calls to key legislators in leadership positions, either on the Senate Early Learning and K-12 Education Committee, the House Education Committee, and/or budget committees.

If you can do either of the following, please contact the LEV organizer in your local area:

HELP SUPPORT THE LEAGUE OF EDUCATION VOTERS | Donate online


League of Education Voters

League of Education Voters

2734 Westlake Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109
206.728.6448

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May Education Advocate

Education Advocate, League of Education Voters Newsletter, May 2017

Greetings

Chris Korsmo

Chris Korsmo, CEO

As the Washington legislature continues to hammer out a solution to funding schools in our state, now is a great time to honor our teachers through Teacher Appreciation Week. If you are able, please join me in celebrating the adults who care for our kids.

Tomorrow is GiveBIG day. Thanks to a matching grant, every dollar you donate to the LEV Foundation will be doubled, up to $5000. The League of Education Voters collaborates with communities across the state to listen, collect, and amplify stories from educators, parents, students, and community members to support legislators in making informed decisions about public education. Please support LEV’s work with your donation today to ensure the voices of our community are heard by legislators. Thank you!

Read below for more about our work.

Thanks for all you do for kids. We couldn’t do it without you.

Chris Korsmo signature

Senator Ann Rivers

Where does Ann Rivers see common ground for McCleary?

Ann Rivers, Co-Chair of the Education Funding Task Force and member of the Senate Early Learning & K-12 Education Committee discusses why she decided to run for office, where she sees common ground for a McCleary education funding solution, and her favorite classroom accomplishment when she was a middle school teacher.Listen now

 

Inside Olympia News

Improving education in Washington

What’s the best way to improve education in Washington? Inside Olympia gets perspectives from Chris Korsmo, League of Education Voters CEO and Washington Education Association President Kim Mead. Watch now

 

 

GiveBIG to League of Education Voters 2017

It’s time to #GiveBIG!

#GiveBIG is a day for all of us to come together and stand up for what we believe in. Tomorrow we need YOU to stand up for education and #GiveBIG to LEV Foundation! Thanks to a generous supporter, your donation will be doubled with a matching gift. Help us hit the $5,000 matching challenge goal with your gift today! The best part? You don’t have to wait! Schedule your donation now

 

Hot Revolution Donuts donated to the LEV Breakfast

Donut drop!

Teachers and support staff at Boston Harbor Elementary in Olympia were the lucky recipients of donuts from Hot Revolution Donuts. Hot Revolution Donuts is a mobile food business with a simple mission: to serve the most delicious, highest quality mini donuts directly to you in the Seattle area. Frank Ordway, Assistant Director of Government and Community Relations at the Washington State Department of Early Learning, won the raffle prize of donuts for his favorite school of choice at this year’s LEV Annual Breakfast.Congrats!

 

Representative Pat Sullivan

New podcast with House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan

House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan, member of the Appropriations Committee and member of the Education Funding Task Force, to discusses how parents, teachers and the community can get involved in a McCleary education funding solution, why teachers are so important, and what he would tell someone who is considering a run for public office. Listen now

Get Involved

Many of you are watching closely and know that Sunday, April 23rd was the last day of legislative session, the legislature is now in special session. We would like to encourage lawmakers to collaborate in order to work out a solution that puts equitable funding into K-12 public education.

The Campaign for Student Success believes our education system should:

  • Provide students the opportunity to earn credits for college while still in high school.
  • Ensure that dollars follow your student to the classroom – whether they’re spent for English language learners, advanced placement or special education – not on bureaucracy.
  • Help remove barriers in getting to school for kids who are in poverty, who are homeless, or who face other challenges that increase their risk of falling behind.
  • Prepare all kids to graduate from high school prepared for careers or college based on their interest and talent.

We need your help in the following two ways:

  • Make a visit to your legislator in your district.
  • Make phone calls to key legislators in leadership positions, either on the Senate Early Learning and K-12 Education Committee and/or budget committees.

If you can do either of the following, please contact the LEV organizer in your local area:

HELP SUPPORT THE LEAGUE OF EDUCATION VOTERS | Donate online

Posted in: Education Advocate, Funding, Legislative session

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WA kids need heroes like you! #GiveBIG to LEV on May 10th







In a rural community in northern Washington lives an unsuspecting super hero. Her name is Liz, and when she became a special education teacher fourteen years ago, she did not know that she would also become an advocate, a super hero, for her students.

Liz reflects, “No matter how wonderful your teaching program is, nothing quite prepares you for your first classroom! I was surprised to discover I was now running a one-room schoolhouse for students with special needs, all at different levels. Most of these students were low income and received free or reduced lunch. My staff and I make sure students have clean clothes, extra food, and social and emotional supports. Without these basic needs being met, learning would be impossible. 

I love my job but I don’t always have the resources my students need, because our school doesn’t receive the funding it needs. There isn’t usually a debate about the need for additional services, but whether our school will receive the funding to provide the student what she needs.

The League of Education Voters field team collaborates with communities across the state to listen, collect, and amplify stories like Liz’s to support legislators in making informed decisions about public education. Will you support LEV’s work with your donation today to ensure the voices of our community are heard by legislators?


Schedule your gift today and your donation will be doubled! Thanks to the generous matching gift of an anonymous donor every dollar given through GiveBIG will be matched up to $5,000.

Thank you for all you do for Washington’s kids.

Chris Korsmo signature

Chris Korsmo  |  CEO
Office: 206.728.6448
Twitter: @edvoters
Visit us at educationvoters.org or on Facebook

League of Education Voters
Working to improve public education in Washington state
from cradle to career with ample, equitable, and stable funding

Our physical address:
2734 Westlake Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109

Donate May 10 at GiveBigSeattle.org and help nonprofits make Seattle a stronger, more vibrant community for all. Today, you can schedule your donation so that you’re all set to make your donation on May 10!

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