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Archive for Legislative session

LEV Interviews State Superintendent Chris Reykdal About His Long-Term Vision for K-12 Education

OSPI Chris Reykdal - League of Education VotersLeague of Education Voters Communications Director Arik Korman sat down with Superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal to discuss his six-year K-12 education plan, how the plan would prepare our kids for what comes after high school, and how we can help make it happen.

 

Listen:


 

Listen to Washington STEM CEO Caroline King talk about Career Connected Learning

Listen to Rep. Pat Sullivan talk about solutions to the McCleary education funding debate

Listen to Senator Ann Rivers talk about common ground for a McCleary education funding solution

Listen to Senator Hans Zeiger talk about McCleary school funding solutions

Listen to State Superintendent Chris Reykdal talk about priorities for his first 100 days

Listen to Governor Jay Inslee talk about his 2017 state budget

Listen to Senator Christine Rolfes talk about the Education Funding Task Force

Listen to Rep. Ruth Kagi talk about the Governor’s Blue Ribbon Commission on Children and Families

Listen to Washington state Teachers of the Year talk about teaching philosophy, classroom accomplishments and education priorities

Posted in: Blog, Career and College Ready Diploma, Career Technical Education, Closing the Gaps, Early Learning, ESSA, Funding, Higher Education, Legislative session, Media Clips, Podcast

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Korsmo’s Weekly Roundup: Principals and Chardonnay

Chris Korsmo

Friends,

Well. What to say? No. Really. What is there to say? We aren’t going to talk about politics in the other Washington lest we start looking for an all-too-early excuse for room temperature chardonnay. And there’s not been a ton of progress – not public anyway – on the state budget. Fret not! It’s never a bad time to get smarter about education funding. (Put down that chardonnay! Learning is fun!)

They Call Me McCleary: First, you can catch yourself up on where things stand in the negotiations over ed funding – often shorthanded by the name of the court case the state is responding to: McCleary. Don’t miss the fight over the “Staff Mix” in the budget debate or you’ll never get the full story on how we build and perpetuate inequitable funding systems. If you’re going to understand ed funding, it’s good to know where the money goes. And, lest you forget, the people that make up the bulk of the system’s budget have thoughts on how the money should be used.

While we wrestle this issue to the ground and then some other states are working to solve the same problem.

It’s the Principal of the Thing: When you think of a school principal’s day what comes to mind? Waltzing through classroom after classroom interacting with teachers and kids, bringing a waft of fresh instructional leadership into every room they enter? Or maybe you remember the time(s) you were sent to the principal’s office and a different kind of wafting. Truth is that for many the day consists of one fire drill – sometimes literally – after another. Lunch duty, bus patrol, tying shoes, negotiating newly exposed hormones among tween girls, kids and sometimes parents with serious trauma, interspersed with classroom observations and report after report compiled and submitted. D.C. public schools is trying to get their principal corps back into the role they were hired for: instructional leadership.

And for as sexy as I just made the whole principal experience sound, teachers will climb the ranks of administration because it’s the only way to a significant increase in pay.

The Rest:

  • When confronted with a problem, one district changed everything to solve it.
  • I saw this in my college town: gaps
  • We love brain science!
  • Speaking of science

As always, thank you for all you do on behalf of our kids.

Chris

 

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Posted in: Blog, Closing the Gaps, Funding, Legislative session, Weekly Roundup

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May Education Advocate

Education Advocate, League of Education Voters Newsletter, May 2017

Greetings

Chris Korsmo

Chris Korsmo, CEO

As the Washington legislature continues to hammer out a solution to funding schools in our state, now is a great time to honor our teachers through Teacher Appreciation Week. If you are able, please join me in celebrating the adults who care for our kids.

Tomorrow is GiveBIG day. Thanks to a matching grant, every dollar you donate to the LEV Foundation will be doubled, up to $5000. The League of Education Voters collaborates with communities across the state to listen, collect, and amplify stories from educators, parents, students, and community members to support legislators in making informed decisions about public education. Please support LEV’s work with your donation today to ensure the voices of our community are heard by legislators. Thank you!

Read below for more about our work.

Thanks for all you do for kids. We couldn’t do it without you.

Chris Korsmo signature

Senator Ann Rivers

Where does Ann Rivers see common ground for McCleary?

Ann Rivers, Co-Chair of the Education Funding Task Force and member of the Senate Early Learning & K-12 Education Committee discusses why she decided to run for office, where she sees common ground for a McCleary education funding solution, and her favorite classroom accomplishment when she was a middle school teacher.Listen now

 

Inside Olympia News

Improving education in Washington

What’s the best way to improve education in Washington? Inside Olympia gets perspectives from Chris Korsmo, League of Education Voters CEO and Washington Education Association President Kim Mead. Watch now

 

 

GiveBIG to League of Education Voters 2017

It’s time to #GiveBIG!

#GiveBIG is a day for all of us to come together and stand up for what we believe in. Tomorrow we need YOU to stand up for education and #GiveBIG to LEV Foundation! Thanks to a generous supporter, your donation will be doubled with a matching gift. Help us hit the $5,000 matching challenge goal with your gift today! The best part? You don’t have to wait! Schedule your donation now

 

Hot Revolution Donuts donated to the LEV Breakfast

Donut drop!

Teachers and support staff at Boston Harbor Elementary in Olympia were the lucky recipients of donuts from Hot Revolution Donuts. Hot Revolution Donuts is a mobile food business with a simple mission: to serve the most delicious, highest quality mini donuts directly to you in the Seattle area. Frank Ordway, Assistant Director of Government and Community Relations at the Washington State Department of Early Learning, won the raffle prize of donuts for his favorite school of choice at this year’s LEV Annual Breakfast.Congrats!

 

Representative Pat Sullivan

New podcast with House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan

House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan, member of the Appropriations Committee and member of the Education Funding Task Force, to discusses how parents, teachers and the community can get involved in a McCleary education funding solution, why teachers are so important, and what he would tell someone who is considering a run for public office. Listen now

Get Involved

Many of you are watching closely and know that Sunday, April 23rd was the last day of legislative session, the legislature is now in special session. We would like to encourage lawmakers to collaborate in order to work out a solution that puts equitable funding into K-12 public education.

The Campaign for Student Success believes our education system should:

  • Provide students the opportunity to earn credits for college while still in high school.
  • Ensure that dollars follow your student to the classroom – whether they’re spent for English language learners, advanced placement or special education – not on bureaucracy.
  • Help remove barriers in getting to school for kids who are in poverty, who are homeless, or who face other challenges that increase their risk of falling behind.
  • Prepare all kids to graduate from high school prepared for careers or college based on their interest and talent.

We need your help in the following two ways:

  • Make a visit to your legislator in your district.
  • Make phone calls to key legislators in leadership positions, either on the Senate Early Learning and K-12 Education Committee and/or budget committees.

If you can do either of the following, please contact the LEV organizer in your local area:

HELP SUPPORT THE LEAGUE OF EDUCATION VOTERS | Donate online

Posted in: Education Advocate, Funding, Legislative session

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LEV Interviews Rep. Pat Sullivan About Solutions to the McCleary Funding Debate

Representative Pat Sullivan - League of Education VotersLeague of Education Voters Communications Director Arik Korman sat down with House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan, member of the Appropriations Committee and member of the Education Funding Task Force, to discuss how parents, teachers and the community can get involved in a McCleary education funding solution, why teachers are so important, and what he would tell someone who is considering a run for public office.

 

Listen:

 

Listen to Senator Ann Rivers talk about common ground for a McCleary education funding solution

Listen to Senator Hans Zeiger talk about McCleary school funding solutions

Listen to State Superintendent Chris Reykdal talk about priorities for his first 100 days

Listen to Governor Jay Inslee talk about his 2017 state budget

Listen to Senator Christine Rolfes talk about the Education Funding Task Force

Listen to Rep. Ruth Kagi talk about the Governor’s Blue Ribbon Commission on Children and Families

Listen to Washington state Teachers of the Year talk about teaching philosophy, classroom accomplishments and education priorities

Posted in: Blog, Early Learning, Funding, Higher Education, Legislative session, Podcast

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Korsmo’s Weekly Roundup: Overtime Begins Next Week

Chris Korsmo

Well, it’s that time.

Where all metaphors for things that take longer than planned – again – are pulled out. The legislative session is wrapping up without a budget agreement, which means lawmakers will be called back into special session. For some this is Groundhog Day. For others it’s Mad Magazine. Still others envision a multi-year advent calendar of legislative treasures. And of course, there are the inevitable sports event references. For you Dragnet fans from the Wayback Machine, we even have a “just the facts, ma’am” approach to the effort. However the story gets covered, the plain and simple truth of the matter is that education funding – resolving the over-reliance on local levies while also making targeted investments to improve outcomes – is the major sticking point. Legislators will adjourn over the weekend with much work left to do – let’s hope they aren’t making a deal more difficult on the way out.

If they’re looking for guidance, the Superintendents of Education Service District 189 have some suggestions worth considering. While they’re at it, let’s build in more transparency into the system so that it doesn’t take a massive investment from Steve Ballmer to actually follow the money.

Meanwhile, you can track all that is – or isn’t – happening here on our bill tracker. And hear from one of the 8 legislators working to craft an education compromise, Senator Ann Rivers, here.

In other news:

  • I’ve marched for a lot of things. But never did I think we’d have to do it for science.
  • Marchers, leave that plastic water bottle on the shelf and fill a reusable…
  • What’s love got to do with it?
  • If it makes you happy.
  • Did you see who ‘Hawks open up with? Oh, Yes…

‘Til there’s news to share, thanks for all you do on behalf of Washington’s kids.

Chris

 

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Posted in: Funding, Legislative session, STEM, Weekly Roundup

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LEV Interviews Senator Ann Rivers About Solutions to the McCleary Funding Debate

Senator Ann Rivers - League of Education VotersLeague of Education Voters Communications Director Arik Korman sat down with Ann Rivers, Co-Chair of the Education Funding Task Force and member of the Senate Early Learning & K-12 Education Committee, to discuss why she decided to run for office, where she sees common ground for a McCleary education funding solution, and her favorite classroom accomplishment when she was a middle school teacher.

 

Listen here:

 

Listen to Senator Hans Zeiger talk about McCleary school funding solutions

Listen to State Superintendent Chris Reykdal talk about priorities for his first 100 days

Listen to Governor Jay Inslee talk about his 2017 state budget

Listen to Senator Christine Rolfes talk about the Education Funding Task Force

Listen to Rep. Ruth Kagi talk about the Governor’s Blue Ribbon Commission on Children and Families

Listen to Washington state Teachers of the Year talk about teaching philosophy, classroom accomplishments and education priorities

Posted in: Blog, Funding, Legislative session, Podcast, Teacher Prep

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An Early Learning Perspective on the House and Senate Budget Proposals

Jennifer Jennings-Shaffer, Children's Alliance - League of Education VotersBy Jennifer Jennings-Shaffer, Early Learning Policy Director at the Children’s Alliance
Guest Blogger

Early learning is the foundation of the education continuum; it supports a child’s progress in school and in life. The House and Senate budget proposals each address early learning—but differ markedly in their approach to three key areas of interest to education advocates. Here’s how:

First, both budgets recognize the value of access to high quality pre-kindergarten. The Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP) is quality pre-kindergarten for income-eligible children who all too often face barriers to success in K-12. When poverty and other barriers tip the scales of child development toward the negative, ECEAP tips them back toward a good education, a good job, and a good life. Eligible families earn less than 110 percent of the federal poverty line—for a family of four, that is less than $26,730 per year. Despite delivering proven results in academic achievement, lawmakers fund ECEAP for fewer than half of our state’s eligible families—leaving approximately 23,000 children eligible but unserved. This is a missed opportunity.

The Senate budget proposes to provide access to ECEAP for an additional 1,200 children and increase the rate paid per ECEAP slot to more accurately support our early-childhood educators. The House budget proposes to provide access to an additional 2,043 children and also increases the slot rate. The House budget builds upon the proposal from the Senate; it is good progress toward ensuring that children who stand to gain the most from access to high quality pre-kindergarten get it.

Second, neither budget proposal responds to the crisis we see in child care, where lawmakers are giving working families inadequate support to meet rising costs. Washington is already one of the least affordable states in the country for families to find child care. The rates paid to center-based child care providers serving tens of thousands of children in the Working Connections Child Care (WCCC) program are far below the nationally recommended benchmark of 75 percent of market rate. When lawmakers try to offer assistance at these inadequate rates, child care providers face a difficult choice: serve families at a loss, stop serving them, or pass the cost on to (often only slightly) more affluent families to make up the difference. Lawmakers need to respond by raising rates for Working Connections Child Care paid to center-based providers. Neither the House nor the Senate budget adequately addresses this issue. The Senate budget includes $8.1 million for rate increases and the House budget includes $20.3 million. Advocates estimate that $40 million is the minimum investment necessary to protect access to child care.

Beyond failing to adequately address child care rates, the Senate budget includes deep cuts to child care access and quality. The Senate budget proposes a cut of -$31.9 million in access to WCCC. This cut includes eliminating 12-month authorizations for families and decreasing the number of families who can be enrolled in the program. If enacted, these cuts would mean that enrolled families could lose care in the middle of the year due to minor changes in their circumstances. Families who need and qualify for care would find themselves on a waitlist. Additionally, the Senate budget proposes to cut the Early Achievers program by $16.6 million. Early Achievers supports child care providers to improve their quality. These cuts put the brakes on our steady progress to ensure that Washington kids enter kindergarten ready to learn.

Third, evidence-based home visiting programs and paid family leave are both proven strategies for supporting parents as their child’s first and most important teacher. Both the House and Senate budgets protect access to home visiting services but only the House budget includes funding to implement paid family leave. Quality time at home with one’s newest family members is associated with improved maternal and infant health outcomes and increased employee retention. State and local governments across the country are increasingly implementing this smart policy.

We all have a stake in making sure that ALL our kids get a great start. As the House, the Senate and Governor Jay Inslee prepare to finalize a two-year state budget, we are calling on lawmakers to sustain and enhance their early learning investments. Children’s brains develop more rapidly in the first five years of life than at any other time. We cannot hope to close the achievement gap in K-12 if we ignore the early years.

Posted in: Blog, Closing the Gaps, Early Learning, Funding, Legislative session

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A Higher Ed Perspective on the House Budget Proposal

By Juliette Schindler Kelly, Director of Government Relations and Advocacy at the College Success Foundation
Guest Blogger

On March 27th, the Washington state House Democrats released their operating budget proposal for the 2017-19 biennium, SHB1067. Generally it was received favorably by the higher education community as supporting our priorities, and as a necessary improvement upon the Senate’s postsecondary funding approach. Additionally, many representing postsecondary in the education advocacy space emphasize the need to support the entire education continuum, from the formative preschool years to post-high school additional credential or degree. The House budget demonstrated an understanding of moving beyond the McCleary mandate to provide genuine learning opportunities for Washington’s youth.

The House budget expands higher ed pathway opportunities, with a focus on preparing Washington students for today’s labor market. Affordability and pathways are key components, although there is still room for enhancements. The approach to addressing the cost barrier for students pursuing postsecondary study is a combination of a tuition freeze (with backfill for the public institutions of higher education so that the loss of funds is not detrimental), with need-based financial aid in the form of bolstering the State Need Grant. Investing in the State Need Grant to give more low-income students access to postsecondary education is a critical component to increasing access for Washington students. Unlike the Senate budget, the House proposal opens the door for 6,000 more of our students to receive a State Need Grant. The goal should be for all 24,000 deserving but unserved students to not have to struggle to find a way to afford college, but this step moves us closer to the goal post.

The budget also displayed an understanding that obstacles exist beyond financial need.  Many students need assistance in the transition to, and persistence within, their postsecondary experience. Low-income, first generation students often need extra navigational assistance in this foreign environment. Many students from diverse and economically-challenged populations attend community and technical colleges, and benefit greatly from student advising and supports. Therefore, it is gratifying to see the proposed increase for community and technical colleges (CTCs) to use Guided Pathways, or a similar model designed to improve student success, to better serve students in this system.

Breaking down barriers to postsecondary opportunities is for naught if the basic needs of a low-income individual prevents him from pursuing further education. The Senate budget proposal diverts Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Work First dollars to support the State Need Grant program, which is counterproductive. The House budget writers are wise to include increased funding to address homelessness and augment the TANF, State Family Assistance, and Refugee Cash Assistance Program grant amounts. These programs help stabilize the families of the very students we seek to provide a greater opportunity for focused learning.

Budgets reflect priorities, and although there is more work to be done, we applaud the House for targeting many of the essential priorities that will help move our state forward, advance our economy and close opportunity gaps. In this spirit, let us all support greater investment in our education system from early learning through higher education so that increased attainment will reap greater prosperity for all Washingtonians.

Posted in: Blog, Funding, Higher Education, Legislative session

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Chris Korsmo: My Ed Path

Chris Korsmo

When I reflect back on my education, it becomes clear pretty quickly that there was not one big “aha” moment. I didn’t just wake up one morning and was suddenly enlightened about everything on the face of the earth. And we haven’t yet figured out how to download information directly into our brains, like Carrie Anne Moss suddenly learning how to fly that helicopter. Everything I learned built on what I had learned previously. Graduation requirements at my high school were aligned to college-going. While rigorous, those requirements allowed for the arts. Seven years of marching band made me who I am today. All the stories about band camp are true.

This is why our vision at the League of Education Voters is for every student in Washington state to have access to an excellent public education – from early learning through higher education – that provides the opportunity for success. And this is why LEV is a proud member of the Cradle Through College Coalition.

To that end, during the 2017 legislative session, LEV is advocating for:

  • Additional funding for increased access and participation in high-quality early learning programs across the state
  • A system that attracts, retains, and supports qualified and effective educators, which includes teachers, para-educators and principals, while addressing needs for equitable access to quality instruction
  • Programs and funding targeted toward students who need it most, providing both academic and non-academic supports for students to improve outcomes and make progress in closing the opportunity and achievement gaps
  • An accountability system that provides transparency for families on school budgets and student outcomes, measures student and school success meaningfully, and provides effective state- and district-level supports for struggling schools
  • Additional funding to serve all students eligible for the State Need Grant

Here’s what we know about our kids: They all have assets. Every one of them has talent. They are not widgets. They want to know that what they’re learning has meaning. And they want you to know their names. For all the difficulty we ascribe to changing education policy, it’s really pretty simple:

  • Foundational skills that transfer with them to careers
  • Access to information about possible career choices
  • Individualization
  • Applied learning or relevance
  • And adults who care about them

Speaking of caring adults, none of my success would have been possible without great teachers. Research consistently shows that a great teacher has the single biggest impact on whether a student will succeed. I know this from personal experience, and I thought you might appreciate these photos from my education path:

League of Education Voters CEO Chris Korsmo's education path

Spring Day at Beloit College was a huge day of fun. There were no classes, and air band contests were the order of the day. Guess which band we were and who I was? I believe the year was 1983. I’m holding a toilet brush, in case you’re curious. For the record, the brush was brand-new.

I couldn’t have made it to Beloit without support from my favorite teacher, Sue Remley. I had her twice for math in high school and she took me under her wing. I could tell she was paying attention, which is why I did not want to let her down.

Her expectation for me was a motivating factor in applying to and going to college, because she let me know when the SATs and ACTs were. She even asked me who I was sending them to. She had 150 kids a day, in six or seven classes. And she knew everybody. I wasn’t the only person she was talking to. I wasn’t the super special kid. Everybody was super special. And that was cool.

Wouldn’t it be great if every student had a story about a favorite teacher, and every student had access to great teachers from early learning through higher education to help them along their education path? Call your legislators and encourage them to support the full education continuum at 1-800-562-6000. If you need help finding your legislators, just click here.

 

#MyEdPath

Posted in: Blog, Career and College Ready Diploma, Closing the Gaps, Early Learning, Funding, Higher Education, Legislative session, Teacher Prep

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Korsmo’s Weekly Roundup: Sunny Skies for Now

Chris Korsmo

You ever play those meeting “icebreaker” games where you have to indicate which tree you’d be, or what animal you were in a past life? If the legislature were a condiment, what would it be? My vote this week is ghost pepper sauce. Discuss.

Money, Money, Money, Money. Money! When last we met we shared the news that the legislature had averted multiple local education funding crises by passing an extension of the levy cliff. This was welcome news for many, even as attention quickly turned to the bigger issue, McCleary. The good news? The economic forecast is sunny. The bad news? Well, for now, there really isn’t any. Yes, the two sides might bicker from time to time and we don’t yet have a final plan to fund, but we will. Our aim is to make sure more of the resources intended for kids who need something more or different – see gaps diatribe below – actually get those resources. Even while we build a compensation system that our education professionals find both fair and energizing.

Next week we’ll get our first look at how the Senate will address education funding when they release their budget. Expect the House version the week after. Here’s how things stack up so far.

Testing Testing: The state’s long love affair with the testing debate will air in all its glory next week when Senate Education takes up HB 1046, the House bill that “delinks” passing the state’s math, English language arts and science exams from high school graduation. Superintendent Reykdal was asked about it recently and spoke in support of removing the requirements. We’ve long taken a different position, that delinking the exams makes it difficult to know whether they’re taken seriously. As the only consistent statewide measures of proficiency, we need good – comparable – data that tells us how our students are doing and importantly, how students fare by groups. We’ve long said we can’t close gaps we can’t see. Between the national moves to reduce federal oversight – or even expectations – and the state wanting to no longer (accurately) capture this information, our kids caught in the opportunity and achievement gaps will be invisible. And, sadly, kids who think they’re college material because they can pass the high school courses that meet the graduation requirements will often find out that they are in fact, NOT ready for prime time. For a state with the kind of student academic performance we have – only 31% of our kids get a degree or certificate from a two- or four-year college – this is a major step backward. Proponents will say that kids are the only ones being held accountable for proficiency – the graduation requirements are high stakes exit exams. It’s true our system is not a bastion of accountability. But eliminating the little bit that we have will only hide the gaps, mislead our kids, and drive our degree completion rates in the wrong direction. (How do I really feel?)

While we’re talking about money, the President’s budget was released this week and it is not a good time to be poor, or a first-generation college student, or a kid in after school programs. The good news here is that a President’s budget is typically just a conversation starter. And, by the looks of it, everybody’s talking.

Light Reading:

  • Sometimes a walk in the woods really pays
  • Speaking of gems, there’s one right in our backyard.
  • More thinking on the causes and impacts of the achievement gap.

As always, thank you for all you do on behalf of our kids. Happy Saint Paddy’s Day!

Chris

 

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Posted in: Blog, Career and College Ready Diploma, Closing the Gaps, Funding, Legislative session, Weekly Roundup

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